4 laws governing logical oppositions

There is another aspect that must be considered. This aspect is the relationship which the propositions have to each other.

4 laws governing logical oppositions

We have learned something about the general and special types of propositions in a previous essay. This brings us to the matter of logical opposition. Propositions are said to be logically opposed to each other when they have the same subject and predicate but with a change in quality or quantity or both.

The Nature of Logical Opposition We have already learned that all truth is based on the three laws of thought known as the Principle of Identity, the Principle of Contradiction, and the Principle of the Excluded Middle. These three principles are the foundation for all human knowledge. They are self-evident and need no proofs or demonstrations.

If we reject them, however, we are at the end of rational discussion since we need to accept them as true in order to initiate and continue any rational discussion.

The Three Laws of Thought There are three important laws of thought that every critical thinker needs to know. Without them, we would find it very difficult to reason correctly.

Law of Logical Opposition by Jannel Domondon on Prezi

There are four possible way in which a proposition having the same subject and the same predicate may appear: They can be diagramed, together with their mutual relations as opposites, in what is called a Square of Opposition.

The Traditional Square of Opposition Here are explanations of the four types of opposition and the four relations resulting from the opposition: Both propositions, the universal and the particular, are called subalterns.

The universal is the subalternant A and E. The particular is the subalternate I and O.

Here is a diagram showing the logical opposition of propositions with examples provided: The Laws of Logical Opposition We can now formulate certain laws of truth and falsity regarding propositions which contain these various relations. This law has two phases, depending on whether we begin with the truth or the falsity of one of the subaltern propositions.

4 laws governing logical oppositions

The truth of the universal involves the truth of the particular A to I, E to O ; but the truth of the particular does not involve the truth of the universal I to A, O to E. If A is true, I must also be true.

If E is true, O must also be true. If I is true, A need not be true, but is doubtful. If O is true, E need not be true, but is doubtful. There are, therefore, two sections to this first rule.

What is true of the whole must be true of every part of the whole. What is true of a part of a class need not be true of the whole of the class.

Although the particular propositions I and O are true, their respective universals A and E are false. It could happen, of course, that what is true of some is also true of all and what is true of a part is also true of the whole. In this case, both the particular propositions I and O are true, and their respective universals A and E are also true.

But we are never permitted to conclude from the truth of the particular to the truth of the universal. It may be so, but it need not be so.

We cannot validly argue from some to all and from the part to the whole. The falsity of the particular involves the falsity of the universal; but the falsity of the universal does not involve the falsity of the particular.

Here we begin with the falsity of one of the subaltern propositions I to A, O to E. If I is false, A is also false. If O is false, E is also false. If A is false, I need not be false. If E is false, O need not be false.C. FOUR LAWS GOVERNING LOGICAL OPPOSITIONS 1. Law of Contradiction 3.

Law of Sub-Alternation 2. Law of Contrariety 4. Law of Sub-Contrariety 1. Law of Contradiction → Two contradictory propositions cannot be both true and both false at the same time.

Jan 25,  · From the square of opposition to the logical square. In the square of oppositions, this converts to “A is I” (see below). Thus we have merged the metaphysical laws governing the Model with the 34 of its epistemological identities or non-identities.

ANTANANARIVO, May 4 (Reuters) - Madagascar’s opposition called on Friday for the government to resign, a day after after the High Court ruled election laws as unconstitutional.

ANTANANARIVO (Reuters) - Madagascar's opposition called on Friday for the government to resign, a day after the High Court ruled election laws as unconstitutional. The square of opposition is a chart that was introduced within classical (categorical) logic to represent the logical relationships holding between certain propositions in virtue of their form.

The square, traditionally conceived, looks like this: The four corners of this chart represent the four. Eduction or logical equivalence is an inference in which the meaning of the original proposition is made clear in the second by the use and removal of negatives, and by interchanging the position of the subject and predicate of the original proposition.

Square of Opposition | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy